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Will automated translation ever take away the need for human translators?

In what may have been a surprising outcome to some, human translators triumphed over AI programs yesterday at the Human vs. Artificial Intelligence Translation Challenge at Sejong University, Seoul.

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Infix beats the rest when it comes to translation

Well, I received for translation two PDF files (MSDS) which contained headers and footers, as well as tables, complete with some logos. I tried the usual methods (OCR with Trados amongst them) but nothing yields the desired results. Character corruption and misplacing of lines or table rows was quite pesky. The client needed it in pdf, of course. Simple text converting wouldn’t do it, as well (I tried this with freeocr, but of no avail). I opened the Infix and started intuitively to go about converting my pdfs. I opened the files and a pop-up appeared saying I can’t edit the file. What? Something was wrong. I started searching through the menus and didn’t find the option I wanted. Again, I thought, no solution to this? But, lo and behold, I found on google (with reference to iceni site) the workflow for preparing pdfs for translation. Yes, under Document>Translate>Export. It all went smooth, I translated the xml files in Trados (I already have the TM from previous attempts) and it was only needed a few tweaks, far less as compared with other methods. I used the Professional approach, and that’s what it was. Recommended!

-Dan Butuza


Language

Lost in Translation

We’ve seen the demand for products that aid translation grow exponentially over the past few years, as cross-country collaboration becomes more popular and diverse, and here at Iceni we have made sure that our products have grown to meet this demand, with Infix now supporting 26 languages and counting, including French, German, Russian, English and Catalan. However, as this surge in translation products grows, we look at the flip side of the coin; what about those languages and dialects that have been lost in translation?

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Freelance PDF Translation with Infix

As a freelance translator, I struggled for years with PDF-to-Word converters (I’ve tried them all, and there are many) and had mixed results, but the clean-up process was invariably time-consuming, having to run macros and specialized software, and get rid of pesky tags…

But with Infix, I can simply export all the text within a PDF to simple XML for easy processing in my CAT software. Even the most complex page layouts are supported.

When I brought up a minor issue with the program, support got back to me immediately – and great, fast, reliable support is a huge relief in my business, where every minute counts.

Iceni Infix is a unique offering in the plethora of PDF applications, it stands out as the de-facto best way to handle them as a freelance translator.

Many thanks to the team for an amazing product!

– Marc Rizkallah


Skeptic won-over by PDF Translation Technology

I’m reviewing the Infix PDF Editor. I was very skeptical, to be honest, because I just couldn’t see how it would manage to do all it boasted.

My business deals with translations. Many clients send PDF only material which we then have to translate. The process involves having to extract the text, translate the text, and then create, or re-create, the format for them. This process is time consuming and even with extra costs being compensated, it is a huge time management fiasco!

Your software setup was quick, the instructions were simple, and the process was painless.

First, I exported the text into XML format. It asked to save the file, so I simply added a number 2 to the end of the file name. Then I processed the translation as usual, and once done, I imported the text back into the Infix software. Wow, there it was! I did have to tinker with some layout, and I did have to move some text around a bit, but THERE IT WAS!

I think this will be ideal for smaller projects without a lot of formatting issues, but it will certainly be a step-saver even for larger projects.
Oscar Andrino
Global Business Translation Services


PDF translation using MacOSX and Infix

As a freelance copywriter and translator (WillHelton.Com), I’m often called upon to work with a variety of different file types. Some of theses are easier to deal with than others and PDFs in particular can be tricky depending on how they were created and what the customer’s expectations about the finished product might be.

I was recently asked to translate two large PDF files with extensive, complex formatting. This included column layouts with enclosed graphics, diagonal and vertical text, and other complications. I’ve never really been satisfied with the results I’ve obtained so far with my current toolset, so decided to ask my fellow Mac-based translators what they find most useful. Hands down the most recommended solution was Iceni Infix and it’s easy to see why.

Installation was a breeze – simply download the dmg, double click, and drag the Infix icon into the provided shortcut to the Applications folder and then launch. You are given three installation modes to suit your particular needs: Form-filling mode (to quickly and easily fill out PDFs), Standard mode (for everyday editing and commenting of PDFs), and Professional mode (for advanced editing, translation work, find & replace in multiple documents, etc.).

Working with Infix also couldn’t be easier. The interface is very intuitive and I was able to open a very large PDF, export an XML version of the content to my favourite translation management tool, and get straight to work. The ingenious bit here for me, though, is that Infix gives you the ability to save off a working copy of your PDF to use as the template for re-importing your translated XML file later. This ensures that the finished translation preserves the formatting and layout of the original file.

If your PDF isn’t a “true PDF” (i.e. is a scanned text file), Infix also includes an OCR recognition function. Although not perfect – it is very resolution dependent and can produce duff text in spots – the ability to edit output on the fly makes it very serviceable.

In short, I’ve found Iceni Infix to be a feature-rich application that makes working with PDFs almost a joy. If you’re looking for a professional solution for editing or translating PDF files, I highly recommend giving Iceni Infix a try.

– Will Helton


Exotic PDF editing and translation – out of the box!

I’d like to give feedback on how Infix PDF editing saves us as a charity (University of the Nations) a lot of time.
Because of many people going through our study courses and internships, we have a lot of written research material on our file servers. Most of them are in editable and PDF file formats. But some of them, the important ones of course, we only have as PDF because the author left us already.

Because of our multi-language setting in our study courses, we need some of these documents to be translated in different languages. And now is the time for Infix pdf editing.

We tried several PDF editors (real and “so called”) and only Infix convinced us to be the tool we need. The demo version does all we need (beside the watermark, but that’s OK so far).

Text editing even with exotic fonts works out of the box (no other program was so easy for this). Image relocation works and so on. And the best of it: it doesn’t need long time to get familiar with it!!

We are very excited about this program. It saved days for us.

– Danilo Ludwig


Infix can be a “game changer” for PDF translation projects

This program [Infix] is the solution I have been looking for! I am a professional translator, and in the past when clients gave me a .pdf document to translate, I would either plead with them for a .word version, threaten to charge them more, or simply refer them to another colleague willing to deal with the headache. Infix PDF Editor has changed the way I do business.

I can use it in conjunction with my CAT (Computer Assisted Translation) memory tool to manipulate the source document and work on the translation as easily as I would with any other format. Then I can save my work, open up the PDF editor, and see in real layout how the final product will look. It is fairly intuitive to use, and a little practice goes a long way, too.

If you’ve resorted to reading this blog, I’m sure you’ve already tried all of the other “solutions” for dealing with PDF documents (copy-pasting, adding comments, whining, etc.). This is a much more elegant and professional way, and certainly worth the reasonable learning curve.

– Ben Guevara


Feedback – Chinese translations using Infix

I am a college student form China. My teacher gave me a task that to translate a professional manual from English to Chinese. The manual file is a PDF file not the doc file I am familiar. So I tried to search for the corresponding editing software to edit the text. Of course I tried the Adobe’s software first, but I find it difficult to change the text in the text box because of the code of each font is different. And I can only remove the original text box and place a new text box on it. But thus I can’t keep the original composition.

And then I tried Infix software, it can satisfy what I want, easy to make several different code of fonts in a same text box. Most important is that the edit procedure is similar to Microsoft Word which is known for almost people. Then, I finished my work easily, and introduce the Infix editor to my teacher and my friend. Now I am working on my task paper using Infix PDF Editor.

Thank you all your crew very much!
Happy Chinese New Year : )

– Jingmiao Zhang


Assorted ice cream cones including chocolate, vanilla and strawberry

The 3 types of scanned PDFs

Did you know there are actually 3 different types of scanned PDF which can, if you’re not careful, complicate the task of translation:

  • The simple scan – every page is just an image.
  • Searchable scans – each image has hidden text behind it.
  • Mixed – can include scanned images, hidden and real text all in the same PDF.

TransPDF will automatically run OCR on a PDF if it detects no real text – in other words, type 1 from the list above. But for types 2 and 3 it will sense the presence of real text and skip the OCR phase. This can be a problem when you need to translate all the text in the PDF.

Infix to the rescue

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