Category Archives: PDF Translation


Assorted ice cream cones including chocolate, vanilla and strawberry

The 3 types of scanned PDFs

Did you know there are actually 3 different types of scanned PDF which can, if you’re not careful, complicate the task of translation:

  • The simple scan – every page is just an image.
  • Searchable scans – each image has hidden text behind it.
  • Mixed – can include scanned images, hidden and real text all in the same PDF.

TransPDF will automatically run OCR on a PDF if it detects no real text – in other words, type 1 from the list above. But for types 2 and 3 it will sense the presence of real text and skip the OCR phase. This can be a problem when you need to translate all the text in the PDF.

Infix to the rescue

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Beautiful Latina Woman at table in Kitchen with Coupons

Ignore page headers and footers in PDF

When you want to get the text out of a PDF for translation or any other reason, headers and footers can cause problems. Often repeated across every page, they break up your text-flow and are time consuming to remove.

Fortunately it’s pretty simple to tell Infix PDF Editor to ignore header and footer regions before you export the PDF.

Use the Crop tool to drag-out a box which includes all the text you want from a typical page, but excludes the header and footer areas. Then press the Return key to finish. The next time you export the PDF, all text outside of your crop-box will be ignored.

It’s easier to see it in action, so we’ve prepared a short movie showing how it’s done. You can also read all about the Crop tool in the on-line user-manual.


heart-hands

MemoQ 8.1 adds TransPDF integration

Great news for MemoQ users – TransPDF is now available from right within your favorite translation tool.

Along with a host of other new features, the MemoQ update includes direct integration with TransPDF meaning that you can now do all your PDF preparation, previews and generation without ever having to leave MemoQ.

You can read all about version 8.1 at the official product page. I also recommend you take a look at their excellent step-by-step guide to handling PDF jobs with the new software and TransPDF.

And remember, as always, you can edit your translated PDFs for free using Infix PDF Editor.


jealous markup

Converting a 500-page PDF user manual with TransPDF

Translation expert Gábor Ugray has posted a fascinating series of articles on his blog documenting his efforts to translate an apparently simple iOS app.

We particularly like part 4, in which he uses TransPDF to mine information from existing PDFs to improve the translation process – a use for TransPDF we’d not even considered before.

Along the way, he’s very complimentary about TransPDF –

The really cool thing about TransPDF is that it’s able recreate a fully formatted PDF from the translated XLIFF that you upload… And when I say this is a cool thing, I really mean cool, as in way out there, extraterrestrially cool.

Check out his article which includes links to the entire series.


WORRY

Worried about security when translating PDFs?

We know some of our users love the idea of our new PDF translation service – TransPDF, but can’t take the risk of uploading confidential PDFs to a public server.

Others have such high volumes of PDFs to translate, they would need an entire server all to themselves!

We think we now have the answer.
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scanner

Translate scanned PDFs with TransPDF

We all know TransPDF makes the job of translating PDFs faster and easier than it’s ever been. If only it could handle our scanned PDFs, it’d be so much better…

Well now it can!

We’ve added automatic conversion (OCR) of scanned PDFs to make them fully editable and translatable. Simply upload your PDF to TransPDF and you’ll get beautifully clean XLIFF in return.

There’s no additional charge for the service but we do deduct your final-PDF fee at the start of the process rather than at the end like normal, even for users with a valid Infix license.

Try it now, it’s fab!

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memsource

Memsource integrates with TransPDF.com

We’re pleased to report that on-line translation specialists Memsource have launched an update to their platform which includes direct integration with TransPDF.

Now Memsource 6.0 users can go from PDF->XLIFF->PDF using the combined power of Memsource and TransPDF.com. Users will need to register for a free Transpdf.com account then enter their new account details into the Memsource platform.

Since all new accounts get 50 free pages, some will find that’s plenty for their first PDF translations.

Read the company’s announcement for further details.

Read our own step-by-step guide to using Memsource with TransPDF.

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SDL’s Paul Filkin takes a look at Infix 7

Language Division’s Client Communities Director – Paul Filkin gets to grips with Infix 7 and TransPDF.com to translate a real-world PDF.
It’s fair to say he likes what he sees both with Infix 7 and the XLIFF translation facilities of TransPDF.com.

“This is really a wonderful tool even without the translation options.”

Paul helpfully includes screenshots and a short movie showing his efforts translating a highly styled car brochure.
Finally he ends with his own wish-list for features he’d like to see in future from us.
You can read his full and informative blog post Paul Filkin’s blog.

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19241487-directional-sign-with-easy-hard-way-and-sky

Infix beats the rest when it comes to translation

Well, I received for translation two PDF files (MSDS) which contained headers and footers, as well as tables, complete with some logos. I tried the usual methods (OCR with Trados amongst them) but nothing yields the desired results. Character corruption and misplacing of lines or table rows was quite pesky. The client needed it in pdf, of course. Simple text converting wouldn’t do it, as well (I tried this with freeocr, but of no avail). I opened the Infix and started intuitively to go about converting my pdfs. I opened the files and a pop-up appeared saying I can’t edit the file. What? Something was wrong. I started searching through the menus and didn’t find the option I wanted. Again, I thought, no solution to this? But, lo and behold, I found on google (with reference to iceni site) the workflow for preparing pdfs for translation. Yes, under Document>Translate>Export. It all went smooth, I translated the xml files in Trados (I already have the TM from previous attempts) and it was only needed a few tweaks, far less as compared with other methods. I used the Professional approach, and that’s what it was. Recommended!

-Dan Butuza


Under the hood

Infix – it’s real power is under the hood

Under The Hood of a PDF Engine

Infix is one of the few PDF editors which gets things done.

First of all, very useful in my line of work is the option to export the PDF for use with CAT tools (xml only so far, but probably other options will be available in time).

Second, I was amazed by the many options for manipulating the text. Replacing fonts is easier than ever, resizing, splitting or joining textboxes is just a child’s play. You can rebuild a textbox just with the selected text, split a textbox in several others containing a paragraph each, and most important, formatting of the text almost never fails.
After translating the exported .xml, importing the translation is just a breeze and in less than a minute you have a document with the exact same look as the original. And very accurate, too.

An intuitive interface might let you think that Infix is just a simple tool, but don’t be deceived:
it’s real power is under the hood.
It’s not perfect, but it’s still one of the best .pdf editors I’ve tried

– Sandu Ionut


You should try TransPDF.com for PDF translation – it uses the same PDF engine as Infix but has been super-charged for translators offering XLIFF import/export and superior handling! – Guy.