Category Archives: Infix News


Command-line utilities replaced by Infix PDF Editor

At the office I use a legacy system from which I get reports in PDF format. The system is not flexible enough to make changes as needed. Infix has allowed me to edit those PDF reports without effort. This results in a product without artefacts which looks so good that is suitable to be sent to my clients.

Infix is easy to use, lightweight and automatically creates backup copies of the edited file. Although I recommend saving the edited file with a new file-name, this feature proved to be very useful to me several times.

I have been using several other applications, each best at what they do, to split or collate documents, re-arrange pages, change page order, rotate pages, etc., but I find Infix is the one package that can do it all. It is difficult to justify using any other software now that I’ve got used to Infix’s many features. Thanks to Infix I won’t be using command line applications any more!

– Ricardo Fernandez


Skeptic won-over by PDF Translation Technology

I’m reviewing the Infix PDF Editor. I was very skeptical, to be honest, because I just couldn’t see how it would manage to do all it boasted.

My business deals with translations. Many clients send PDF only material which we then have to translate. The process involves having to extract the text, translate the text, and then create, or re-create, the format for them. This process is time consuming and even with extra costs being compensated, it is a huge time management fiasco!

Your software setup was quick, the instructions were simple, and the process was painless.

First, I exported the text into XML format. It asked to save the file, so I simply added a number 2 to the end of the file name. Then I processed the translation as usual, and once done, I imported the text back into the Infix software. Wow, there it was! I did have to tinker with some layout, and I did have to move some text around a bit, but THERE IT WAS!

I think this will be ideal for smaller projects without a lot of formatting issues, but it will certainly be a step-saver even for larger projects.
Oscar Andrino
Global Business Translation Services


A PDF Editor for Freelance Writers

I’m a freelance writer and editor and work with PDFs in the course of my work every day, but I’ve never found a quick, easy and self-explanatory way to edit a pre-written PDF until today when I came across Infix PDF editor.

Often when you need some software quickly a search online using Google (or whichever search engine you prefer) will successfully turn up what seem to be the answer to your needs, but hours later you’re stuck with a selection of poorly designed or inaccessible software products on your laptop that you don’t want and still left scratching your head as to how to solve the problem, or worse, find that you’ve inadvertently downloaded something which is untrustworthy or damaging. I can’t count the number of times this has happened to me.

So I was so pleasantly surprised to find that Infix does what it claims to do, doesn’t install any unwanted extras in your computer, and is straightforward to understand, which is essential if like me you’re downloading it to use while on a deadline. I was able to select the part of the text that I needed to remove and replace it with the new lines in a couple of seconds without reading any manuals or watching any tutorials – I’ll be recommending this product to anyone who asks me for a reliable PDF editor in future.

– Jai Temple


PDF translation using MacOSX and Infix

As a freelance copywriter and translator (WillHelton.Com), I’m often called upon to work with a variety of different file types. Some of theses are easier to deal with than others and PDFs in particular can be tricky depending on how they were created and what the customer’s expectations about the finished product might be.

I was recently asked to translate two large PDF files with extensive, complex formatting. This included column layouts with enclosed graphics, diagonal and vertical text, and other complications. I’ve never really been satisfied with the results I’ve obtained so far with my current toolset, so decided to ask my fellow Mac-based translators what they find most useful. Hands down the most recommended solution was Iceni Infix and it’s easy to see why.

Installation was a breeze – simply download the dmg, double click, and drag the Infix icon into the provided shortcut to the Applications folder and then launch. You are given three installation modes to suit your particular needs: Form-filling mode (to quickly and easily fill out PDFs), Standard mode (for everyday editing and commenting of PDFs), and Professional mode (for advanced editing, translation work, find & replace in multiple documents, etc.).

Working with Infix also couldn’t be easier. The interface is very intuitive and I was able to open a very large PDF, export an XML version of the content to my favourite translation management tool, and get straight to work. The ingenious bit here for me, though, is that Infix gives you the ability to save off a working copy of your PDF to use as the template for re-importing your translated XML file later. This ensures that the finished translation preserves the formatting and layout of the original file.

If your PDF isn’t a “true PDF” (i.e. is a scanned text file), Infix also includes an OCR recognition function. Although not perfect – it is very resolution dependent and can produce duff text in spots – the ability to edit output on the fly makes it very serviceable.

In short, I’ve found Iceni Infix to be a feature-rich application that makes working with PDFs almost a joy. If you’re looking for a professional solution for editing or translating PDF files, I highly recommend giving Iceni Infix a try.

– Will Helton


How to Make Infix Portable

Traditionally, most software applications have been limited to the PC or laptop they have been installed on. But many people work in an environment that may require them to use more than one device, or to regularly ‘hot desk’ and spend limited amounts of time at each workstation.

Some applications may only be used for brief periods on the computer before another user takes over that machine. System administrators are understandably nervous of letting users install their own software in case the PC becomes littered with unwanted applications.

There’s also an issue around software licensing; it usually requires an application to only be installed on one device at a time, so if you want to install the application on several devices, you need to buy several licenses. Businesses can often end up with with more licenses than are needed, which isn’t particularly cost effective.

But there is another way.

Continue reading


How to Rotate Parts of a PDF in Infix

In Infix PDF Editor, we can rotate a variety of different objects on the page. We can even rotate entire pages – or the entire document (when we want it to be displayed in landscape or portrait mode).

Infix PDF Editor allows us to create interesting and unusual layouts when we rotate individual objects like text boxes or images. In this document, we’ll look at a few of our options for rotating PDFs and individual selections within them.

Continue reading


How to Change a PDF Font Quickly

While editing a PDF, you might need to change the fonts to match your company branding or to bring a dated document in line with current branding guidelines. You may have been sent a document with an unusual font which you don’t have on your own PC (if the document contains subset fonts, it may not include every available character, so editing can be troublesome).

You may simply prefer the look of an alternative font and want to swap fonts in your PDF to improve the appearance.

Whether you’re changing a font in a single sentence or throughout an entire document, doesn’t have to be a laborious process using Infix PDF Editor.

Continue reading


How to Bookmark Pages in a PDF

When you start to produce large PDFs in Infix, bookmarks become an essential navigation tool. User need bookmarks to help them find sections in a PDF quickly, and you’ll find them handy when you want to look something up months down the line. Bookmarks can even be used as an interactive table of contents for viewing your PDFs online.

Infix PDF Editor offers a number of bookmarking features to facilitate your work, whether they are for your eyes only or for your readers as well. In the screenshot below, you can see how bookmarks have been used to create a table of contents in the Infix PDF Editor manual – a large document that would otherwise be difficult to navigate.

Continue reading


How to Convert PDF to Word

When working with PDF files, one of the most common questions people ask is how to convert PDF to Microsoft Word format.

In this article, we’re going to look at some options for conversion.

Continue reading


Design Engineers use Infix to speed-up form-filling

I own a small business which is in a constantly changing marketplace. We are design engineers and professional A/V integrators endeavoring to staying abreast of the latest A/V technology. To accomplish that goal, we are required to interact with hundreds of vendors and manufacturers. Often a manufacturer will change their dealer terms and/or agreement, require an updated credit form, require a special form to be filled out to enable a drop shipment of equipment, or credit card or a spiff form completed, et cetera. This is but a small sample listing of the forms required to be filled out, which are sent to us on a regular basis. In general, they include many text fields and numerical fields to be completed on each page – additionally, some requiring photos, signatures, et cetera.

Numerous forms we receive are old and have absolutely no interactive or editing capability. Sometimes we receive documents via mail which need to be completed – the ultimate hassle. One method, often utilized by us, is to import the emailed PDF document, or scan, into a CAD application – importing a file for each page, one page at a time. Next we add a transparent layer above the incomplete form and proceed to create text fields for each entry field required. When the need for a signature arises, we import a signature – previously created with a freehand graphics application, into the transparent CAD layer. Once that action is completed, we convert the layers to a single PDF document for each page, on a one-by-one basis. Definitely a very slow procedure… to the point where we wait until the last possible moment before we actually complete the tedious process.

And then tax season arrives… where all the documents from the accountant – which require editing, field completion and signatures – are old PDFs (we believe the accounting firm recently learned email!)

This process leaves CAD documents for each form, which now require coordinated… Ugh!

After learning about Infix, we felt like we had been missing out on one of the greatest efficiency-based applications ever created. What a time saver it would be to directly edit and complete all the PDFs we receive; and simple email them back to sender. WOW, excellent! What a revelation!

– R.Rosati