Category Archives: Big Brands


iOS 8

A Look at the New Features of Apple’s iOS 8

Earlier this month Apple unveiled iOS 8, it was billed as “The biggest release since the Launch of the App Store” and compared with its predecessor it comes with a great range of new features, offers increased performance speeds and an array of further enhancements that allow for a greater intuitive user experience.

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Editing label templates in PDF using Infix PDF Editor – a success story!

I am disabled, so to earn a bit of extra money, I design logos and labels for products that regular people sell.
I normally buy my labels from a specific company which I will not mention here. They provide templates for their labels in different formats and the only two I was familiar with were .doc and .pdf. I tried the .doc templates only to find out that the real template settings sometimes extended to 4 digits and Word can only handle 2 and it rounds up or down apparently randomly so by using that type of template, the labels always printed off the label.

I decided to try the .pdf templates and tried many different programs including Adobe Illustrator at a friend’s house. I spent 3 days (overstaying my welcome using his computer by quite a lot his son finally told me) and the learning curve to use Illustrator was just too much for me.

I finally found Infix PDF Editor. The tool-bar was laid out logically and the images describing what tool was what were very familiar to me. To say that Infix PDF Editor is user-friendly is a severe understatement.

I loaded up the .pdf template and Infix told me that this .pdf file might not be editable due to some reason I don’t remember, but there was a button to click to fix the issue so I clicked it and POOF, problem solved. I then easily found how to add an image to the .pdf template, and again, POOF, there was my image. It happened to be too large to fit into the templates so I chose the familiarly labelled Object tool which had a handy pop-up that informed me that I had chosen the tool to select, resize, or move objects. Once that tool had been chosen, my image now had the familiar ‘grab’ squares at the corners and centre of sides of my image. Within seconds, I had resized my image to fit into the label selection circle (I was using a 2 inch round label). At that point, it was a simple matter of copying and pasting my image into the following label selection circles.

With Infix PDF Editor, in less than 5 minutes, I was able to accomplish what I had been trying to do with a multitude of other programs for about 2 weeks.

I would highly recommend purchasing Infix PDF Editor especially since all the free ones I tried either had the same issue with rounding off label spacings or were just too difficult to learn to use in the time I had to get my order printed and out to the customer. The non-free programs I tried were essentially the same, the learning curve was just too long, or the program was so limited that I could not even do what I needed to do to even evaluate the software. If you get Infix PDF Editor, you will not be disappointed.

– William Connor


IBM Logo

IBM 370/135

42 years ago today IBM installed the first IBM 370/135 mainframe computer,  just one of the models included in the S370 series which IBM ran for nearly 20 years, achieving significant market share in the process.

 

Both developed and manufactured by IBM in the UK, the IBM 370/135 and 145 were the mid to lower end of the mainframe range, following on from the high end machines released in 1970 which superseded the System/360 family of computers.

 

Key features of the IBM 370/135 included:

 

  • 240,000 bytes of main memory capacity, four times greater than the S360/30 with Microcode reloadable control storage (RCS) supplementing this with a further 24,000 bytes.  The option was also available to increase the RCS to 36,000 or 48,000 bytes if required.
  • Monolithic circuitry that increased internal operating speeds, exceeding those of the S360/30 over four fold, resulting in speeds of 275 to 1,430 nanoseconds for one microinstruction completion.
  • ICAs – Integrated Communications Attachments allowing terminals to be linked to the central processor via up to 8 communication lines, without the need for separate control units.   The 370/135 also offered compatibility with virtually all of IBM’s terminal devices.
  • Expanded Channel capacity that enabled block multiplexing and increased system throughput.
  • Advanced self-checking features and console critical points status displays.
  • Increased disk storage, with optional integrated file adapter together with additional disk storage features were available, removing the need for separate disk control units.
  • Backward compatibility with the S/360 models, offered as standard with all 370/- models allowing customers easy migration to the 370/- mainframes.
  • OS/DOS program compatibility support.

 

With a starting price of nearly $500,000 ranging to over $1,000,000, rentals also proved popular with monthly contracts upwards of $10,000. Later additions to the 370/- portfolio saw the inclusion of full virtual memory before the range was finally superseded in the 1990’s by the IBM System/390.

 

Image credit: http://bit.ly/1nVE5EW

 


Anniversary of Windows Server 2003

 

April 24th 2003 saw the release of Windows Server 2003 by Microsoft, with the server operating platform set to provide greater performance and scalability compared to Windows 2000, its predecessor. At the same time as Windows Server 2003 Microsoft also launched Visual Studio .Net 2003 and the Enterprise Edition of SQL Server 2000, in turn enabling users to increase productivity with a more cost effective and reliable solution, as well as benefiting from a 30% increase in infrastructure efficiency that this new release offered over Windows NT 4.0

 

Following its beta version success, feedback confirmed that through Windows Server 2003 Microsoft were able to provide deployment cost reductions of up to 50% whilst providing a 40% increase in stability for some companies when compared to Windows NT 4.0.  Other benefits reported included a reduction of up to 30% in relation to the number of servers needed to achieve the same workload throughput with some customers also benefitting from a 20% reduction in management costs.

 

Windows Server 2003 was the first server designed to support Intel Itanium 64-bit systems and therefore able to serve high levels of demand and business workloads.  It offered increased scalability for those who needed it as well as a solution to meet the needs of the small business with simplicity and ease of use key features of the release.

 

Over 5,000 developers and 2,500 testers were involved in its production, Microsoft implemented 650 advancements and enhancements with Windows Server 2003 including increased security with changes made to default installation components and the IIS web server rewrite, as well as the first of Microsoft’s operating systems to be included in its Trustworthy Computing initiative, which it set up to address concerns regarding privacy, security and public confidence in the industry.  Further developments were evident in terms of improvements to Message Queuing, the Active Directory and Group Policy.  The Automated System Recovery which replaced rescue disk creation together with enhanced back up and disk management features were also included.  Greater management functionality was offered with the Manage Your Server Tool for administrators and support for watchdog timer for the restarting of a server was also included.

 

Microsoft offered Windows Server 2003 in five editions Web, Standard, Enterprise, Datacentre and Small Business and on December 6 2005, Windows Server 2003 RS was subsequently made available.

 

Windows Server 2003 would be succeeded by Windows Server 2008 following its release by Microsoft on 4th February 2008.

 

Image Credit: http://bit.ly/1jA2DPF


Freelance PDF Translation with Infix

As a freelance translator, I struggled for years with PDF-to-Word converters (I’ve tried them all, and there are many) and had mixed results, but the clean-up process was invariably time-consuming, having to run macros and specialized software, and get rid of pesky tags…

But with Infix, I can simply export all the text within a PDF to simple XML for easy processing in my CAT software. Even the most complex page layouts are supported.

When I brought up a minor issue with the program, support got back to me immediately – and great, fast, reliable support is a huge relief in my business, where every minute counts.

Iceni Infix is a unique offering in the plethora of PDF applications, it stands out as the de-facto best way to handle them as a freelance translator.

Many thanks to the team for an amazing product!

– Marc Rizkallah


A Movie in the Making – Steve Jobs

 

Whilst speaking at the Tribeca Film Festival, Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin hasn’t given too much away about one of his latest projects, whereby he focusses on the life of Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple.  Although his screenplay is based on the biography written by Walter Isaacson, Sorkin has confirmed that he has achieved his goal in creating something that is very different and doesn’t take the form of a biopic.

 

The Sony production was originally expected to be directed by David Fincher, however Danny Boyle is now the favourite to direct this movie which is due to begin filming later in the year.  Rumours are also rife that Leonardo DiCaprio could be in line to play Jobs in the movie.

 

It will be very interesting to see how the film develops, especially as in only 2013 Ashton Kutcher played the Apple co-founder in the film entitled Jobs, which focussed on Jobs’ early life and the journey of Apple’s creation and success.  Prior to this in 1999, Pirates of Silicon Valley starred Noah Wyle as Steve Jobs and explored the challenges faced together with Steve Wozniak, played by Joey Slotnick, in founding what would later become one of the biggest ever global brands.

 

So what could be covered in the latest film about the incredible life of the Father of the Digital Revolution?, it will be difficult to tell the tale without reflecting on so many of the significant events that took place in one person’s lifetime.  From his early adopted life and eventful college experiences to the 1st Apple Computer developed by Jobs and Wozniak in 1976, and the amazing technology and growth of the company that followed. It may include Jobs’ shock departure from Apple in 1985 whereby he later founded NeXT, followed by the surprising acquisition of NeXT by Apple and Jobs return to the company which he would then led to bring us the iconic and revolutionary technology of the iMac, iPod, iPad, iPhone, iTunes and iCloud, technology that is used globally on a daily basis by us all.

 

Image Credit: http://bit.ly/1fUYR5s


Find & Replace in Legal PDFs

I am always looking for tools to help with my work as an attorney, faculty member and IT professional. Many pdfs have language that I would like to be able to change, but the traditional pdf tools are not up to the task. Infix PDF Editor has a large suite of tools. A favorite of mine is Find and Replace. It works just like the function in my favorite word processor. There is also a spell check and the various text formatting tools.

Other functions allow objects to be manipulated. Lines can be added, including those with color. This allows sections of documents to really stand out. There are also various drawing tools (as in Paint and similar programs). Finally, there are the standard tools one finds in Acrobat and other pdf programs.

PDF Editor is really remarkable because it combines aspects of different programs to allow one to edit PDFs as if they were a different form of document. I highly recommend Infix PDF Editor for editing tasks.

– Jonathan Warshay


Anniversary of Microsoft 3.1 Release

Microsoft released Windows 3.1 on 6th April 1992, and in doing so addressed a number of issues experienced with Windows 3.0, with over 1000 changes made offering enhanced usability following extensive client feedback.

Improvements were made to the Windows Installation with the inclusion of the Express Install feature, with Custom Installation and Batch Install options together with improved network setup also available to users.  The set up programme was also able to detect additional hardware and software configuration compared to 3.0.

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Anniversary of the Launch of Apple’s OS X

Following the successful launch by Apple of the Mac OS X Server 1.0 on March 16th 1999, the Mac OS X desktop version known as Cheetah was released 2 years later on March 24th 2001 superseding the Mac OS 9.  The new generation of operating system was based on technology developed by Steve Jobs’ company NeXT through its OPENSTEP system, a move which saw Apple purchase NeXT and Jobs famously return to the company he co-founded taking the position of interim CEO.

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A look at Yahoo!

 

We’ve all heard of Yahoo! – back in the late 90s and early 00s, Yahoo was one of the biggest and most popular search facilities online, and even despite the dot-com bubble burst in 2001, it continued and continues to this day to be one of the key players in the online search market, as well as offering free email services, a comprehensive website directory and a question and answer service, aptly named Yahoo! Answers.

 

Have you, however, ever heard of Jerry’s guide to the World Wide Web? Well, if you haven’t, you have now, and if you’re wondering where we’re going with this, the answer’s simple – this was Yahoo’s name before it became Yahoo! A website that was a directory of other websites, Jerry’s Guide (aka David and Jerry’s Guide) to the World Wide Web was set up in January 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, electrical engineering graduates from Stanford who realised early the power of the Internet and what it could mean for those searching online, and formed the directory to cater to user’s needs by listing other websites in a hierarchy. When it appeared obvious that the idea was a good one, they changed the name to Yahoo!, only two months after they had started in March 1994, and registered www.yahoo.com on January 18, 1995, a year nearly to the date they’d begun.

 

The name Yahoo! itself has often been coined to mean different things. The term “Yahoo” in itself means, “Yay”, “I’ve found it”, “yes”, and other positive terms – great for a facility online used by people find things. Various acronyms have also been accredited to the name, although the official acronym used by the founders is “Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle”. This refers to how the hierarchial Yahoo! Database was arranged at the time, and the terms “officious” and “oracle” referenced the office workers who would be using the website, and the fact the results rendered were the “source of truth and wisdom”, respectively.

 

In recent years, Yahoo has seen a decline since its’ heady days of owning the Internet, but is still particularly popular as a search engine and directory in the US. July 2013 saw Yahoo outperform Google in the number of searches performed where users clicked through to websites listed in its SERPs, the first time since 2011.