Category Archives: Adobe


How to Reduce the Size Of a PDF (Without Acrobat)

If you need to reduce the size of your PDF for storage or email, online guides will almost always suggest using Adobe Acrobat. Not everyone wants to buy expensive piece of software to achieve a simple task. In this article, we’ll look at ways to compress a PDF effectively using Infix PDF Editor instead.

First, let’s look at compression in more detail.

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How to Convert PDF to Word

When working with PDF files, one of the most common questions people ask is how to convert PDF to Microsoft Word format.

In this article, we’re going to look at some options for conversion.

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How to Add Pages to a PDF

Infix PDF Editor allows you to perform some sophisticated edits on PDF files. If you need to add pages to a PDF, there are no fewer than four different ways to achieve this, depending on the source material and the way you want the files to be merged.

Remember: when you add pages to a PDF in Infix, your existing page numbers aren’t automatically updated. Regardless of the method you choose, you’ll need to remove your numbering and add it again or it won’t be accurate or complete. Read our article about page numbering for more information.

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Design Engineers use Infix to speed-up form-filling

I own a small business which is in a constantly changing marketplace. We are design engineers and professional A/V integrators endeavoring to staying abreast of the latest A/V technology. To accomplish that goal, we are required to interact with hundreds of vendors and manufacturers. Often a manufacturer will change their dealer terms and/or agreement, require an updated credit form, require a special form to be filled out to enable a drop shipment of equipment, or credit card or a spiff form completed, et cetera. This is but a small sample listing of the forms required to be filled out, which are sent to us on a regular basis. In general, they include many text fields and numerical fields to be completed on each page – additionally, some requiring photos, signatures, et cetera.

Numerous forms we receive are old and have absolutely no interactive or editing capability. Sometimes we receive documents via mail which need to be completed – the ultimate hassle. One method, often utilized by us, is to import the emailed PDF document, or scan, into a CAD application – importing a file for each page, one page at a time. Next we add a transparent layer above the incomplete form and proceed to create text fields for each entry field required. When the need for a signature arises, we import a signature – previously created with a freehand graphics application, into the transparent CAD layer. Once that action is completed, we convert the layers to a single PDF document for each page, on a one-by-one basis. Definitely a very slow procedure… to the point where we wait until the last possible moment before we actually complete the tedious process.

And then tax season arrives… where all the documents from the accountant – which require editing, field completion and signatures – are old PDFs (we believe the accounting firm recently learned email!)

This process leaves CAD documents for each form, which now require coordinated… Ugh!

After learning about Infix, we felt like we had been missing out on one of the greatest efficiency-based applications ever created. What a time saver it would be to directly edit and complete all the PDFs we receive; and simple email them back to sender. WOW, excellent! What a revelation!

– R.Rosati


How to Work With Large PDFs

Working with large documents can become a chore if you don’t have the right tools, particularly if you’re unfamiliar with the file you’ve been asked to work on. Often, the PDF format is used for documents that are inherently very large: user guides, textbooks and so on. Efficient editing tools make the job much easier.

Infix PDF Editor will help you to manipulate the contents of large PDF files more efficiently. In the newest version of the software, a number of features have been added specifically for this purpose. Let’s quickly look at a few of them.

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That’s when my troubles began.

I’ve been using Infix on and off for a few years now and never had any regrets. It all started when I had to translate a brochure from English into Russian while maintaining the original style and layout.
 
That’s when my troubles began.
 
Lacking a proper professional Adobe Acrobat software I’d gone through a number of third-party PDF editors but even my favorite Foxit Phantom couldn’t handle the layout properly. In some cases text boxes needed resizing, in others Cyrillic symbols were not available, some editors would break down the original into too many objects making it way too tedious.
 
That’s when I stumbled upon Infix and was stunned by the number of tweaks and features I gained control over that at times it felt Adobe itself couldn’t have done a better job. Moreover Infix’s interface is originally designed around editing needs making it very convenient with all the needed tools accessible from a single toolbar. In terms of text editing, Infix flexibility makes me feel like I’ m working in a Microsoft Word environment while objects manipulation reminds of the Page Maker control over page layout.
 
To make it short, Infix became to me a one-stop solution for all my PDF editing needs.
 
Thank you, Iceni!
Regards,
Andrei


Events in Computing History – September

September 2nd


Year:
2008

Event: The first initial release of Google chrome web browser.

Interesting Facts:

  • Although it was released after Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox, Chrome is the most used web browser in the world, taking 39% of the market for usage.
  • Google Chrome is the only web browser with a built in language translator and able to convert up to 53 different languages.

Before chrome was released the chairman of Google (Eric Schmidt) was against the idea of a web browser as he considered the company too small to compete with the likes of Internet Explorer and Firefox and the idea was suspended for 6 years.

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PDF editing on Mac – don’t be put off!

I was very pleasantly surprised with Infix Pro for Mac. I had been looking for an affordable PDF editor for my work. I would like to afford Acrobat, but the price tag strains my shoestring budget near to breaking. Enter Infix Pro! It’s originally built for Windows and retains its interface, but don’t be put off by it – the program will still install correctly.

One big advantage over Acrobat is that you can edit right away without worrying whether a font is missing. While I was editing a book, Acrobat noticed that I did not have the book’s native font, and substituted another one. This worried me; what if the clients specifically wanted that particular font? With Infix, no problem. I was able to make edits without any fuss.

You may have to resize boxes slightly to keep the format, but it’s a very small price to pay for ease of use and affordability. Infix Mac works just like a word processor. Of all of the alternatives, Infix Pro for Mac feels the most intuitive. I highly recommend it, and I’ll definitely be using Infix Pro for Mac for all of my editing needs.

– Linda Apton


Positive review turns out to be an historic occasion

As a historian by profession, I work with a huge amount of PDF files ranging from journal articles through electronic books to scans of primary sources. In the case of primary sources especially, these files often require heavy editing as they can show stains, illegible characters or other forms of damage incurred over centuries.

For a long time, I have been looking for a PDF editor that could handle these complex files as well as advanced OCR operations. In addition, I also required a product running under Ubuntu (even if it meant that I had to use Wine).

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Translating PDF brochures on a deadline

I used Infix PDF Editor for the first time this month in order to translate a very specific brochure which had to remain in the PDF format.

First I tried other software programs but the text and formatting didn’t work for me: the line would just go out of the text box or the font would suddenly change. I was about to give up on the translation when I read a recommendation for Infix PDF Editor in a forum for translators. So I gave it a try and I was very pleased.

This software reads PDF files without any problem and editing is done easily. Very complicated files, like brochures made of various layers, are easy to operate with and transform: fonts can be changed as well as their size, you can use specific characters such as letters with accents…

I found everything working easily and I was able to meet my deadline on time.

– Visnja Jovanovic